The eecPipeline Suite include multiple tools that use the standards established by ASME, the Prager stress-strain model, and the Svensson’s method to make complex calculations required without complicating the process to deliver usable results. This suite of products include:

Pricing

These tools are offered on a variety of levels. To purchase a subscription, please contact webtools@E2G.com for more information.


API 1102 Buried Pipeline Crossing

Design crossings for steel pipelines located beneath railroads and highways in accordance with API 1102. The effects on the stresses in the pipeline from highways, either paved or unpaved, and railroads, including any length and width of track or weight of railcar, can be determined. The applied surface design pressure and total effective stress are calculated, and the results determine whether the steel pipe can withstand the ground surface pressure that the crossing produces.


ASME B16.5 PIPE Flanges

The pressure-temperature rating for a standard flange manufactured in accordance with ASME B16.5 or B16.47 is determined. The pressure-temperature rating is performed according to a specific edition of ASME B16.5 and B16.47. A materials database for these codes is provided. Three options are provided:

  • Option 1 – Given a pressure, temperature and material of construction, the required ASME flange class is determined.
  • Option 2 – Given a flange class, pressure and material of construction, the maximum temperature is determined.
  • Option 3 – Given the flange class, temperature and material of construction, a maximum pressure is determined.

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Branch

Branch reinforcement calculations for integrally and pad reinforced fabricated connections (i.e. run pipes and headers) are performed in in accordance with ASME B31.1, B31.3, B31.4 and B31.8 Piping Codes for power, process, liquid transportation, and gas distribution piping, respectively. A materials database for these code is provided. Two options are provided:

  • Design Option – Determine the branch design reinforcement requirements given the geometry, materials of construction, design pressure, design temperature of the run pipe (header) and the branch pipe.
  • In-Service Option – Determine the branch MAWP (MAOP) given the geometry, materials of construction, design temperature, metal loss and corrosion allowance of the run pipe (header) and the branch pipe.

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CP Design Onshore

Determine the necessary cathodic protection (CP) design parameters for satisfying life, current output, and anode weight requirements. The methods are implemented for pipeline transportation applications and above-ground and under-ground storage vessels. The methods are based on the solution procedures outlined in the most up-to-date training courses, NACE CP2 and CP3 and Appalachian Underground Corrosion Advanced Short Course [1-3].

[1] Appalachian Underground Corrosion Short Course, Advanced Course, 2011.

[2] NACE CP2, Cathodic Protection Technologist Course, 2016.

[3] NACE CP3, Cathodic Protection Technologist Course, 2016.


CP Design Offshore

Determine the necessary cathodic protection (CP) design parameters for satisfying life, current output, and anode weight requirements. The methods are implemented for offshore vessel, piping and structure applications. The methods are based on the solution procedures outlined in the most up-to-date offshore standard, DNV-RP-B401 [1].

[1] Cathodic Protection Design, Recommended Practiced DNV-RP-B401e, 2010.


HotTap Welding

The hot tap app assesses the suitability of hot tap welding procedures (or repair welds) by evaluating the risk of burn-through and cold cracking due to rapid cooling. A transient thermal FEA solver is used to predict the peak wall temperature, maximum cooling rate, and shortest cooling time (from 800 C to 500 C) at various locations surrounding the weld region (especially within the HAZ). The cooling effect of the contained fluid (either stagnant or flowing) is of particular importance in hot tap welding, since this may contribute to higher cooling rates, which increases the risk of cold cracking due to the harder material that typically results. In order to account for this, empirical heat transfer correlations are used to estimate the cooling effect of the fluid for both liquid and vapor fluid phases. A selection of common fluids can be chosen, but custom fluid mixtures can also be created by specifying the type and composition of the constituents. For liquids, nucleate boiling is accounted for if the wall temperature exceeds the saturation temperature. For high enough wall heat fluxes, film boiling may occur, which can raise the temperature of the wall considerably.

These cooling rates and cooling times are then used to estimate the hardness of any material that has undergone a microstructural change. The maximum predicted hardness must be less than an upper-bound value that is deemed relatively safe. The carbon equivalent approach is based off of the original work done by Graville and Read (1974) which was later modified by Battelle in their 1991 report. In order to be safe, the carbon equivalent of the material must be less than some maximum carbon equivalent that is thought to keep the hardness less than 350 HV, depending on the cooling rate. When a material composition for the pipe material is specified, a more robust method is used. The Yurioka (1995) model is used to predict the resulting hardness, and as long as that hardness is less than critical hardness values determined experimentally (Bruce 2012), or specified by the user, the risk of cold cracking is assumed to be low. The default critical hardness values depend on the hydrogen content of the electrode.

To assess the risk of burn-through, the maximum inside wall temperature predicted by the thermal model is compared to either the value 1800 F for low-hydrogen electrodes or 1400 F for high-hydrogen electrodes. An inner wall temperature that never exceeds these values is deemed to be at a low-risk of burn-through. This is the generally accepted, albeit somewhat conservative, approach discussed in Bruce 2012 and elsewhere.


Hydrogen Bake Out

Determine the time required for a hydrogen bake-out operation at a user specified temperature to ensure that the remaining hydrogen concentration in the vessel wall is no greater than a user specified maximum value. Cylindrical and spherical vessels may be analyzed. The materials of construction may be specified as carbon steel or a low chrome alloy steel. The shell may include a Type 300 series stainless steel an internal cladding or weld overlay, or a Type 410 cladding. A transient diffusion analysis is performed and the hydrogen concentration in the vessel wall is determined as a function of the shut-down time cycle.

When welding onto hydrogen-charged steel, hydrogen in the vessel wall increases the risk of cracking due to hydrogen embrittlement as the weld metal cools and higher levels of residual stress are induced in the weld region. To reduce this risk, atomic hydrogen present in the steel should be baked-out prior to welding. This is accomplished by heating the steel to a temperature for a sufficient period of time to allow the absorbed hydrogen to diffuse back out of the steel. Heating is required, because both the diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in steel is a rapidly increasing function of temperature.

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Insulation Thickness

Determine the insulation thickness of a cylindrical or spherical component based on one of the following criteria:

  • Economic Thickness
  • Personnel Protection
  • Energy Conservation
  • Condensation Control

Insulation thickness tables are also generated that show insulation thickness requirements for different diameters. These calculations are based on the data provided by the Gas Processors Suppliers Association (GPSA) data book.

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Material Explorer

Access to E2G’s extensive material database for materials typically used in the construction of pressure vessels, piping and tankage is provided. The database includes:

  • Material physical properties – Young’s Modulus’s, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature.
  • Strength parameters – yield and tensile strength as a function of temperature.
  • Allowable design stresses as a function of temperature, allowable stress may be determined based upon a specific year of the code shown below.
    • ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Sections I, Section VIII, Divisions 1 and 2
    • ASME B31 Piping Codes B31.1, B31.3, B31.4 and B31.8
    • API 620, API 650, API 653

The above properties are determined for a specified input temperature. Supplemental output including tables and graphs of material properties as a function of temperature is also provided.


Pipe Pressure-Thickness Tool

Piping thickness, MAWP (MAOP) and MDMT calculations are determined for straight pipe, elbows and miter bends in accordance with ASME B31.1, B31.3, B31.4 and B31.8 Piping Codes for power, process, liquid transportation, and gas distribution piping, respectively. A materials database for these codes is provided. Supplemental loads, i.e. forces and moments, may be specified. Two options are provided.

  • Design Option – Determine the required thickness, recommended nominal thickness and MDMT given the geometry, materials of construction, design pressure, design temperature and supplemental loads.
  • In-Service Option – Determine the retirement thickness, MAWP (MAOP) and MDMT given the geometry, materials of construction, nominal thickness, design temperature, supplemental loads, metal loss and corrosion allowance.

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Pipe Span Pressure Thickness

Calculations to determine the required thickness or MAWP (MAOP) of a pipe span are performed such that a user-specified maximum deflection and slope are not exceeded. Calculations are performed in accordance with the ASME B31.1, B31.3, B31.4 and B31.8 Piping Codes. A materials database for these codes is provided. Concentrated loads can be included and adjusted to model flange junctions, valves and the weight of a person. Distributed loads automatically included in the calculations are the weight of the pipe, insulation, and fluid contents. Longitudinal, circumferential and stress at the supports are computed in addition to pipe properties including metal cross-sectional area, section modulus, moment of inertia and weight. In the weight calculation, the additional weight due to insulation, refractory, and the fluid is accounted for. If refractory properties are input, a modified moment of inertia is computed to model the increase in stiffness due to the specified refractory thickness and its modulus of elasticity. Two options are provided:

  • Design Option – Determine the required thickness and recommended nominal thickness given the geometry, materials of construction, design pressure, design temperature and applied loadings.
  • In-Service Option – Determine the retirement thickness given the geometry, materials of construction, design pressure, design temperature and applied loadings.

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E2G Help Desk Services


Our Help Desk IT specialists and engineers are available for questions about all E2G products. Our goal is to facilitate upgrades and conversions, quickly answer your questions, and help you benefit from our state-of-the-art software products.

216.658.4777

Weekdays 9am – 4pm ET